Tag: Authentication

Merging Multiple User Accounts

.KeyLearning { max-width: 90%; padding: 20px 20px 5px 30px; margin: 40px auto; background-color: #e0e0e0; border: 0px solid #360063; border-radius: 8px; -webkit-border-radius: 8px; -moz-border-radius: 8px; -khtml-border-radius: 8px; } .KeyLearning .KeyLearningTitle { font-size: 1.125em; font-weight: bold; margin-top: 0px; } Social media surrounds us, so it’s not unusual for applications to require some kind of social media integration. The most common issigning in with Facebook, Twitter, or another service. Users expect to be able to log in with different social accounts.

How to Store Authentication Data in a Database. Part 4

Handling user registration and authentication isn’t an easy task. Both users and developers understand this. Users have to select and remember another username and password (taking into account different password policies, of course). A developer’s responsibility is to make this process secure and to properly protect the user’s data. So it’s no surprise that logging in with one account – Facebook or Google, for example – is extremely popular.

Logging in With External Services

Inputting a username and password is one way of accessing an account, but it’s not the only one. In this article, we’ll see how to enable external services (like Google or Facebook) when logging in to a database. What Are External Service Logins? Giving a user the option to access their system accounts through external services is a growing trend among web designers. This option can provide several benefits, such as giving users one less name-and-password combination to remember.

Email Confirmation and Recovering Passwords

Modern applications have plenty of authentication features beside registration and login. In this article we will take a look at how to design the database for two such features: email confirmation and password recovery. Email Confirmation What Is It? Most people familiar with the Internet know what an activation email is. An activation email is sent to the user after he or she registers for an account on a website or web application and contains a link that will allow the user into the system.

How to Store Authentication Data in a Database. Part 1

How difficult is it to program a user login function for an application? Novice developers think it’s very easy. Experienced developers know better: it is the most sensitive process in your application. Errors in login screens can lead to serious security issues. In this article we take a look at how to store authentication data in your database. The most common way to authenticate users nowadays is with user name and password.