Tag: Data Type

Setting Database and Data Types in Vertabelo

Data types are very important for correctly storing information in database tables. In this article, we’ll demonstrate how to choose and implement the right data types for the database you’re designing in Vertabelo. When designing a new database or adding tables to an existing database, it’s essential to choose the right data types; they’ll help you run the right queries, functions, and transformations on your data. Well-chosen database data types will also ensure queries have the best performance.

CHAR and VARCHAR Data Types in Different Database Engines

Storage engines can surprise you. For example, take the CHAR data type. It expects an exact number of characters and by definition stores a fixed amount of information. However, you don’t have to fill all the available CHAR space – a shorter value will work. This is so similar to VARCHAR that I decided to explore the differences between these two types. Before diving into the details, let’s start with some basic information.

SQL Server 2008 Datatypes and the Death of Datetime

Beginning with SQL Server 2008, the datatypes which store date and time were greatly improved. Despite this, many legacy databases (and often newly developed ones) still use Datetime and SmallDatetime, the original datatypes. Aside from the dwindling possibility of backwards compatibility issues, there is no advantage to using these old datatypes; as this article will show, the new implementations are superior in every way. SQL 2005 and Earlier: Datetime and SmallDatetime Datetime and SmallDatetime are the original temporal SQL Server datatypes, and the only options available in SQL Server 2005 and earlier.

Tip #11 – Vertabelo reports that my data type is not supported. What can I do?

Sometimes you may want to use a data type that is so new that Vertabelo doesn’t recognize it. In such cases, the application displays a warning that the data type is not supported. If you find these warnings too distracting, you can turn them off. In this post, we will show you how to do it. Let’s take a look at the following example. Assume that you have a database model for MySQL 5.

24 Database Modeling Tips for Vertabelo

This one is frequently asked on our support: “In the data types panel, I can’t find the data type I need. Does this mean I cannot use it in Vertabelo?” Of course, you can. Vertabelo will never let you get stuck in a data type dead end. Even if the type you need is not listed, it doesn’t mean you cannot use it. Data types you can find under the button are just the most popular ones.

Analysing the SQL Server Numeric Data Types

A common challenge for database modellers is deciding which data type is the best fit for a particular column. It is a problem which involves consideration of both the properties and the scale of the data that will be stored, and in no case is this more evident than when handling numeric values because of the large variety of alternatives that most relational databases provide for their storage.

SQL Server Datatypes: Common Modeling Dilemmas

When designing a database, early decisions can have a huge impact on the performance and storage requirements. These decisions can be difficult to change later, as most subsequent work will depend on the physical model. This article highlights some common design decisions, flaws, and misconceptions. Creating a Primary Key: Uniqueidentifer or Integer When defining a surrogate primary key for a table, two options are the most common: Integer and UniqueIdentifier (aka.

Database Design 101

iframe.video-plugin { width: 735px; height: 415px; border: 0px solid #CCC; margin: 0px; } @media all and (max-width: 767px) { iframe.video-plugin { width: 250px; height: 141px; } } Vertabelo presents part 2 of our Database Design 101 series that brings you easy-to-understand introduction to databases. This time we will focus on table columns and most commonly used data types.