Tag: dwh

A Subscription Business Data Model

In the previous two parts, we’ve presented the live database model for a subscription-based business and a data warehouse (DWH) we could use for reporting. While it’s obvious that they should work together, there was no connection between these two models. Today, we’ll take that next step and write the code to transfer data from the live database into our DWH.The Data ModelsBefore we dive into the code, let’s remind ourselves of the two models we’ll work with. First is the transactional data model we’ll use to store our real-time data. Taking into account that we run a subscription-based business, we’ll need to store customer and subscription details, customers’ orders, and the order statuses.

A Subscription Business Data Model

Can you design an OLAP database model from an OLTP model? In this article, we’ll show you how!This is the second article of our data warehouse (DWH) series. You can find the first one here . The idea behind the series is to start with the OLTP (Online Transaction Processing) database model, present a possible solution for the reporting/OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) data model, and then finally consider the code we’ll use to perform the ETL process.

A Subscription Business Data Model

Welcome to a new series that shows you the practical side of the data warehouse (DWH)! In the first article, we’ll tackle a data model for a subscription business.In previous data warehouse articles ( The Star Schema , The Snowflake Schema , Star Schema vs. Snowflake Schema ) we focused more on the theory. In this series, we’ll show you how you could create a data warehouse for a real-life application, such as a database model. Today, we’ll take a look at the data model behind a subscription-based business. In upcoming articles, we’ll build a DWH and the code that makes the magic work.

The Snowflake Schema

In a previous article we discussed the star schema model. The snowflake schema is next to the star schema in terms of its importance in data warehouse modeling. It was developed out of the star schema, and it offers some advantages over its predecessor. But these advantages come at a cost. In this article, we’ll discuss when and how to use the snowflake schema.The Snowflake SchemaThe snowflake schema’s name comes from the fact that dimension tables branch out and look something like a snowflake. When we look at the model above, we’ll notice it’s a fact table surrounded by a few dimension tables, some of which do the aforementioned branching. Unlike the star schema, dimension tables in the snowflake schema can have their own categories.